Posts Tagged ‘long protocol’

What are the main IVF protocols used in NZ?

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

Why is this important?

First, it’s good to know roughly what’s out there, and that there is more than one option, so that you can get your specialist to explain why this one and why not that.

Second – if you don’t do well on one protocol you may do fine on another.

Some women will need a few tries to find their “Goldilocks” (just right) protocol, but because most of us have only limited finances and stamina, it’s important to make sure you’re satisfied the first one is a good choice for you.

Basically there are three main protocols used by NZ clinics (plus a few variations, which I’ll try to add later):

1. The ‘long’ protocol (default for young women and those with normal FSH; not generally used on high FSHers unless they are quite young, and seldom on anyone over 40 because it can easily oversuppress those with diminished ovarian reserve).

Buserelin for about 10 days to downregulate (put you into temporary menopause), then the Buserelin dose is lowered and you start stims (Gonal F injections), stim for about 10 days with scans and blood tests every 2-3 days. When your follies are ready, you are instructed to take a trigger injection and turn up for egg collection about 36 hours later.

2. The microdose flare – usual starting protocol for high FSHers and women over 40. It’s less likely to oversuppress poor responders than the long protocol.

Usually but not always starts with a course of BCPs (birth control pills) for about three weeks, then you stop for a couple of days, then start your microdose course of Buserelin (this gives your ovaries a kickstart or ‘flare’), then a day or two later you start your stims (Gonal F injections). As with the long protocol, you stim for about 10 days with scans and blood tests every 2-3 days. When your follies are ready, you are instructed to take a trigger injection and turn up for egg collection about 36 hours later.

3. The antagonist protocol – another option for high FSHers, poor responders and older women. Often the first choice protocol for these women, but in NZ it’s typically tried only after the flare protocol has given a weak response because the drugs are cheaper for the flare.

Usually starts with a mild pre-cycle suppression course of estradiol valerate (E2V) from CD21 or 7dpo the previous cycle (you can ttc on your own the previous cycle; this won’t affect a pregnancy); when AF (your period) arrives this is counted as Day 1 and you may be asked to go in for a baseline scan to check that you have no cysts, your antral follicles are ready to go and no big dominant follicles; on CD2 you start stimming, having bloods and scans every 2-3 days. When your lead follicle reaches 14mm, you start Cetrotide (the antagonist that stops you ovulating too soon). When your follies are ready, you are instructed to take a trigger injection and turn up for egg collection about 36 hours later.

There’s another called the Colorado protocol, which is a variation on the antagonist. I don’t have all the details on this and how it’s done in New Zealand, but if someone would like to email me or post it as a comment, that would be a big help!

If you are a poor responder, have high FSH, low AMH, a low antral follicle count, or have been told you have diminished ovarian reserve (DOR), follow this link to check out protocols used for poor responders.

And here’s another link in case you want to know more about the various IVF, IUI and TI (timed intercourse) cycle medications and what they do.