Archive for the ‘PCOS and PCO’ Category

When and how should I seek a second opinion?

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

Suppose you had a friend who was grappling with a cancer diagnosis and kept wondering whether his/her specialist had really considered all the possible treatment angles that might work. Suppose he or she had been receiving some treatment but there hadn’t really been any sign of progress. What would you advise? Probably a second opinion, right?

For some unknown reason, fertility patients seem to struggle with this notion that it’s somehow disloyal to seek a second opinion. Yes, it is awkward. But actually, it’s just good common sense if there’s any little voice inside your head saying “maybe there’s a better way …”  I know several women/couples who have switched specialist within the same clinic and have really agonised over how they are going to “break up with” their initial specialist. But the reality is this happens all the time, and people need to find the fit that’s right for them. My local clinic (FAA) actually makes that transition incredibly smooth and most of the drs are perfectly happy when it happens. [Actually, some may be relieved about getting rid of a “difficult” patient! ;)]

Even if you’re not actually switching specialists, it’s perfectly reasonable to seek out a second opinion if you want to. If you’re publicly funded you may have to pay for the second opinion consult, but that’s money well spent if it’ll give you peace of mind and/or some good ideas that can get you closer to building the family you want.

Remember, just as in any other profession, each individual specialist has certain diagnoses and treatments that they have a particular interest in and more experience in treating. Some gravitate toward the more straightforward cases (early 30s, no tubes, standard protocol, easy success); some specialise in particular issues (endometriosis, PCOS, thyroid problems); some are really passionate about taking on the really challenging cases (women over 40, poor responders, egg quality problems). It’s a good idea to ask around about who’s had success with cases like yours. And that’s a good place to start for a second opinion. Just think, women/couples in the States fly 5 hours from coast to coast seeking a second opinion; we are incredibly lucky that even the other end of the country isn’t that far away! And if travel is really a problem, you can often book a phone consult.

Over the years, one thing I’ve noticed is that the truly professional specialists I’ve spoken to have NO problem at all with my seeking a second opinion. They support my being proactive and are very happy to listen to any ideas I glean from those other consultations. They don’t let egos get in the way of my treatment. While working with my own specialist, I got a copy of all my notes and did a phone consult with a specialist in the States who’s considered the #1 go to guy for women with my particular diagnosis. My specialist in NZ was like nooooo problem – and was very open to the ideas I came back with. We did, of course, have a healthy debate about which of the ideas seemed to make the most sense in my case, but the main thing was that we had that discussion and we made some good decisions together about what to try next.

How do you know you should seek a second opinion?

Well, everyone’s different. For some people, it’s when they’ve just had a failed cycle, they can’t afford to do more than about one more, but the specialist is suggesting just going with the same again. For others, they’ve tried discussing other ideas with their specialist but feel like these aren’t being taken seriously or at least the reasons for not trying these things aren’t being adequately explained. For me, it was feeling like we’d already discussed and tried all the ideas we could think of together, so I needed a fresh perspective, a new source of ideas. Whatever the situation, if there’s a little voice in your head wondering whether you and your specialist have adequately explored all the possibilities, that’s a sign you might want a second opinion. It could just end up confirming what your current specialist is telling you, in which case that’s also useful because it eliminates doubts that you’re doing the right things.

If you think you might want to get a second opinion on your case, here’s what to do:

  1. Get a copy of your notes from the clinic so you know exactly what protocols you have tried already, any testing that’s been done, how you responded to treatment (including E2 levels, follicle sizes, the embryologist’s ratings of embryo quality, etc).
  2. If you can, make a 1-2-page bullet point summary of your history and any testing. This makes it a LOT easier for the new dr to get up to speed quickly on where you are at.
  3. Ask around (e.g. on the Everybody BB’s Infertility forum) to find out which drs at which clinics have had success with your particular diagnosis and history.
  4. Call that dr’s clinic and speak with his/her receptionist; ask for an in-person or phone appointment; ask where and how to send your summary/notes/file.
  5. You don’t have to formally tell your current specialist that you’re seeking a second opinion, but you’ll probably end up informing his/her nurse or receptionist when you request a copy of your file/notes. It’s a courtesy to mention it, but if it’s causing you anxiety then don’t force yourself to. The specialist will understand.
  6. If you are doing a consultation with someone who works at another clinic from your ‘home’ clinic and if you like what they are suggesting as a new plan, discuss with them whether it would be feasible/advisable to (a) ask your current specialist to follow a new protocol; (b) cycle at your local clinic but with the new specialist either calling the shots or providing advice to your own specialist; (c) travelling and doing the whole cycle at the new clinic; or (d) doing egg collection and transfer at the new clinic, but monitoring (ultrasound and bloodwork) locally. All of these options have been done around the country at one time or another.
  7. Don’t worry too much about having to persuade your current specialist to try something new – quite often the specialists will just get in touch with each other and work out how best to work together. Ask your ‘second opinion’ specialist what he/she thinks is the best way to handle this. The politics and the details of this shouldn’t be your problem – you are going through enough stress already!
  8. Don’t worry too much about the ‘disloyalty’ issue either. You have the right to expect specialists (and any healthcare provider, for that matter) to be professional about second opinions and NOT to make you feel guilty about seeking one out. If you find someone is not being particularly professional about it, that tells you more about them than it does about how you handled it. Your priority is to get a baby/family out of this, and their priority should be to help you achieve that dream. The specialists won’t be a part of your life forever, but your babies will!