What is assisted hatching?

Assisted hatching is an optional extra procedure used in IVF where a small hole is made in the shell (or ‘zona’) of a Day 3 embryo. This is supposed to help (in some cases) the embryo ‘hatch’ out of its shell and transform itself into a blastocyst (usually on Day 5).

Probably the best site to get a clear understanding of assisted hatching is the one from the Advanced Fertility Center of Chicago, which shows in great detail how the hatching process works, including a pic of an embryo actually in the process of hatching to become a fully hatched blastocyst. Cool!

In New Zealand assisted hatching is not part of the default IVF protocol, so you would need to ask your specialist about it.

My understanding is that public funding won’t cover assisted hatching (I could be wrong about this – please chime in if you know of criteria for eligibility). But, if you were doing a publicly funded cycle and your specialist agreed it might be a good idea, you could presumably pay for it out of pocket (it’s a few hundred dollars).

If you are a self-pay patient, obviously the choice is with you and your specialist, so ask. However (and someone please update me if this is no longer the case), if you have the OK to transfer more than 2 embies, apparently the clinics are not allowed to do AH on more than two. I can’t fathom the reasoning on that (especially for women over 42), but there you go … Minor trivia, but worth knowing in advance (if you’re like me, you hate surprises cropping up during the cycle).

Just to give a broader perspective, in the States, where patients are either paid for by insurance or out of pocket, assisted hatching (AH) seems to be used more widely. The Advanced Fertility Center of Chicago says they do it on all embryos, but they also offer the following useful list of criteria:

Who should be treated with assisted hatching?

The most commonly used indications for assisted hatching with an in vitro fertilization case are:

  • Age factor – Couples having IVF with the female partner’s age over 37
  • Egg quantity and quality factor – Couples in which the female’s day 3 follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) level is elevated
  • Embryo quality factor – Couples having IVF with poor quality embryos (excessive fragmentation or slow rates of cell division)
  • Zona factor – Couples having IVF with embryos that have a thick outer shell (zona pellucida)
  • Previous failures – Couples having IVF that have had one or more previous IVF cycles that failed

In our IVF clinic, we use assisted hatching on just about all cases – because we think it increases the pregnancy and delivery rates.

For the original page, see http://www.advancedfertility.com/hatching.htm

I’m pretty sure that assisted hatching can be used whether you are doing a 3-day or a 5-day transfer, but generally not for 2-day transfers (the embryologists say the embryo is usually too small then and there’s a risk it could break up if the zona is punctured). With a 3-day transfer, they will do this immediately before they put your embies back. With  a blast (5-day) transfer they would presumably do the AH on day 3 before putting the embryos back for their last two days of development. Anyway, these are just a few things to discuss with your specialist.

As for risks, my understanding there is a very very small increased likelihood of conjoined twins if assisted hatching is used. My own specialist told me that, although this was statistically true, the reality was that the increased chances are so miniscule that they don’t really have practical significance.

Who should be treated with assisted hatching?

The most commonly used indications for assisted hatching with an in vitro fertilization case are:

  • Age factor – Couples having IVF with the female partner’s age over 37
  • Egg quantity and quality factor – Couples in which the female’s day 3 follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) level is elevated
  • Embryo quality factor – Couples having IVF with poor quality embryos (excessive fragmentation or slow rates of cell division)
  • Zona factor – Couples having IVF with embryos that have a thick outer shell (zona pellucida)
  • Previous failures – Couples having IVF that have had one or more previous IVF cycles that failed

In our IVF clinic, we use assisted hatching on just about all cases – because we think it increases the pregnancy and delivery rates.

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4 Responses to “What is assisted hatching?”

  1. Pauline says:

    Hi,

    Very interesting article on assisted hatching. I just thought I’d comment that FAA and FAW have recently told me they will only do AH with day 3 embryos and not day 5.

    Pauline

  2. Eve says:

    Thanks, Pauline. Yes, that’s exactly right that Day 3 is really the only day you can do AH. The thing I am not sure of yet is whether some clinics will do AH on Day 3 embies that they are taking to Day 5 in the lab. Do you (or does anyone) know?

  3. Angela says:

    FA in christchurch are doing AH for us next month on Day 3 and trying to take them to a Day 5 transfer. I’m very nervous about this as I have only done Day 3 transfers in the past (4-5 yrs ago) and I’m doing my last ever cycle at age 44 1/2 yrs. I’m psychologically preparing myself to want a day 3 transfer as I know there won’t be too many eggs retrieved.
    What will be, will be….. I’m preparing myself to be pregnant next year or to be moving onto the next stage in life of growing the kids we have.

  4. Elizabeth says:

    Angela, good luck!!!

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